Random Facts Around Us

There are things around us that we usually see, feel but haven’t got the idea of what they are called. Sometimes it does not bother us to know what it is or what they are. This blog will at least give you some facts or information that is worth your time.

Spaghetti is a sure delicious pasta meal, using these thin strands of pasta you can add different sauces like bolognese, carbonara, meatballs, mushroom and herbs, etc..

A single strand of Spaghetti is called a “Spaghetto”.

·        Pasta is made of flour, eggs, a little water and olive oil.

·  The word ‘Pasta’ comes from Italy means “barley porridge”.

Below are some the different types of pasta;

Lettuce is a member of the sunflower family. The darker the lettuce the more carotenoids it contains. 

·  It was first cultivated in Egypt. 

·  It can reduce the risk of breast cancer.

·  Good for lowering the cholesterol levels.

·  Good source of antioxidant for a healthy skin.

·  Rich in iron that prevents anemia (deficiency of red blood cells or of hemoglobin in the blood).

·   Contains fiber that helps reduce constipation.

·   Loaded with Vitamin C that is good for the immune system.

·  This is the only vegetable that is never sold in processed form.

A water dropwort is a highly poisonous plant. If it kills you, it can cause you to smile after you die. This is called a ‘sardonic’ grin.

Bulls are color-blind and the matador’s red color cape doesn’t really make them angry. The reason why they charge is because of the cape’s movement as the matador sways it.

·    Bulls are more muscular than cows.

·       They can live up to 22 years.

·       They can run around 35 mph and will kill without hesitation.

·       The first Spanish bullfighter to die in a televised bullring fight was Victor Barrio, he died at the age of 29 due to chest injury from his last bullfight.

If a Polar Bear and a Grizzly Bear mate, their offspring is called a “Pizzy Bear”.

Polar bear lives in Northern Arctic such as Russia, Alaska, Canada, United States of America and Norway. 

Even they are living in cold countries you cannot find them in Antarctica.

·   They have two layers of fur a top and a bottom layer that helps them to survive in winter. If they have poor nourishment, they can also freeze to death.

·   Polar bears are good swimmers however, as they cannot cover their nose while swimming, and if the storm hits while they are in the water they are at risk of drowning.

Grizzly bears are omnivores. They have the same size of human fingers and have more muscles on their backs which help them dig.

·   Their common lifespan is up to 28 years.

Violin bows are commonly made from horse hair.

·       It is the smallest and with the highest-pitched instrument in the string family.

·       Andrea Amati was the first maker of four string violin dated in 1555.

·       The word Violin comes the word “fiddle” means stringed musical instrument.

Octopus have three hearts, blue blood and nine brains which is why they are intelligent. They have the central brain and eight small brains in each of their arms.

·  The female octopus do strangle and eat the male after mating and even the male octopus will not be a prey it will soon die the mate because they used up all of its energy for mating.

·     They brood their eggs for 53 months or 4 ½ years.

·           An unhealthy octopus can suffer from autophagy or also called self-cannibalism, they will eat its own arms due to stress.

·          A giant pacific octopus can live up to 3-5 years.

Snakes predict earthquakes. 

They can sense the earthquake five days before it happens and from 120 kilometres away.

·       They don’t have eyelids which is why they cannot blink and so they are sleeping with both eyes open.

·       They only have internal ears.

·       They have very flexible jaws which allow them to eat their prey much bigger than their head.

·       Not all snakes have fangs like pythons.

·       It has a unique organ called “Jacobson’s organ”, which makes them very sensitive to strong smell like clove essential oils and cinnamon.

Author:  Julie Ann Locsin  (08/27/19)

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